Thousands of Federated Datasets on Data.gov Cities, States and Counties Communities

Data.gov’s Cities, States and Counties communities are growing. We have more than 30,000 federated datasets ready for you to work with, and more are being added all the time.


 


You’ll find datasets from such cities as Chicago, New York and Seattle. We’ve got Cook and King Counties, and Denver and San Francisco City and Counties as well.  Hawaii, Illinois and New York have opened up their data, and that means about 25,000 datasets from them alone.


 


What does “federated” mean? It has nothing to do with the Federal government. It’s datahead-speak for making the data capable of talking to one another. Think of the United Nations and everyone wearing headphones so anything said is translated into their language. We’ve kind of put headphones on all these datasets. When you come to Data.gov, if you want to combine Chicago, Cook County and Illinois’ data, you can use them easily, even though they’re from different places and in formats as varied as Socrata, CKAN, Junar or CSV.


 


Developers, when you’re at a hack-a-thon or data jam and need to pull data from many different local and regional sites to create an app, you can come to Data.gov. (That’s true if you’re hanging out on the couch and building an app, too!)


 


Or let’s say you’re a data scientist, analysts or journalist. You can come to Data.gov to easily find comparative data in one spot.


 


Most important, having this federated data here on Data.gov will, we hope, make it easier for citizens to find what they’re looking for , and even more.  You don’t need to know which government manages which data – it’s here.


 


So take a stroll through these communities and see how easy it is to get a more complete picture of your locale than ever before.


 


Sally Ruth Bourrie of Phase One Consulting Group supports Outreach and Communications at Data.gov.


 


 


 


 

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