Tribal Nations Tools – Disaster Risk Reduction

Tribal Nations Tools – Disaster Risk Reduction

  • Coastal Change Analyses for Western Alaska: Interactive Map: Covering the entire extent of the Western Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative’s area, this analyses provide important baseline information on the distribution and magnitude of landscape changes from erosion and aggradation (deposition) over 41 years. The maps document changes in the shape and extent of land, as well as in coastal features such as spits, barrier islands, estuaries, tidal guts, and lagoons. Western Alaska Native coastal communities may use this mapping tool to summarize changes for various parcels of land or assess the extent of habitat loss or gain over the study period.
  • FEMA and Tribal Nations: A Pocket Guide: This guide helps Tribal Nations find and access programs offered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate against emergencies and disasters that impact Indian Country.
  • Guidelines for Considering Traditional Knowledges in Climate Change Initiatives: The Guidelines for Considering Traditional Knowledges in Climate Change Initiatives were developed by the Climate and Traditional Knowledges Workgroup (CTKW), composed of tribal climate experts and partners. Tribes, agencies, and organizations can use this guide as a framework to increase understanding of issues relating to access and protection of traditional knowledges in climate initiatives. It includes both a Primer on Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change and a discussion of ethics to aid understanding and appropriate usage.
  • Indigenous Health Indicators Tool: The Indigenous Health Indicators (IHIs) are meant to provide a clear and broadly understandable depiction of what it means to be healthy for many indigenous communities, as well as a method for evaluating the status of health and well-being. IHIs were developed by Swinomish and Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribes with federal partners. Tribal Nations can use this tool — which incorporates connections to ecosystem health and social/cultural beliefs — to better evaluate and manage public environmental health risks and impacts aligned with their value systems.
  • Local Environmental Observer (LEO) Network: The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) developed the Local Environmental Observer (LEO) network to assist Alaska Native participants, called “LEOs”, post unique or unusual environmental events onto public, web-based maps. The LEO network provides a model for connecting community members with technical experts and resources and is expanding to other regions of the United States and the Arctic.
  • Scenarios Network for Alaska + Arctic Planning (SMAP) Tools: Alaska Native communities rely on easy-to-use multiple SNAP tools, including climate projections, climate science, and data exploration by community name, which rapidly develops a local focus within the broader context of climate change.
  • Water Toolbox: Tribal Nations may take advantage of this Federal Support Toolbox to access a comprehensive “one-stop-shop” online water resources data portal. The site offers direct links to valuable data, state-of-the-art models, and tools for the U.S. and international water resources community to collaborate and share information.