EPA Moving Forward with Publishing Linked Open Data

Making environmental data available for reuse by others is a core strategy EPA uses to help meet its mission of protecting human health and safeguarding the environment.  EPA has a long tradition of publishing data – notable examples include Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data, as well as Envirofacts – a data warehouse that provides public access to data extracts from Agency program information systems.  EPA is also helping to support data discovery through the

Open Government Platform

Check out the first open source release delivered by the US and Indian governments!

Linked Data Goes With DERI

George Thomas, HHS Data ArchitectThrough my travels working on Linked Data projects in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and collaborating with other federal agencies pursuing Linked Data through Data.gov's semantic community, we frequently leverage the work of many talented international contributors to the Linked Data community. It turns out that many of them share something in common–often they're affiliated with the Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI).

Like our ongoing collaboration with RPI's Tetherless World Constellation, the Linked Data rock stars at DERI deserve some Data.gov love for the great work they do, and the many contributions they have and continue to make. Their work touches so many aspects of those in the US who, like me, are in the business of helping to realize Government Linked Data, in conjunction with voluntary consensus standards organizations like the W3C, which is of course central to this open data mission. This post in an overview of just some of the ways we appreciate DERI.