Agriculture

Open Data Revolution to Fight Global Hunger

USDA-NRCS rangeland scientist Emilio Carrillo uses an open data mobile app called LandPKS for sustainable land use management.

Every day, people around the world use data to make decisions.  When heading out of town, most of us use weather apps to check the forecast anywhere in the world before packing our bags.  However, when we travel to far-flung places, we may find ourselves packing food from home because we don’t know what may be available when we arrive.  We have a global, comprehensive, open data set that enables weather forecasting, but not something similar for food and agriculture?

In his first public remarks as head of USDA, Secretary Sonny Perdue noted that “…we want to make decisions based on facts and evidence,” “we want to be data-driven,” and “I need good data, I need good sound science to make decisions on…”

USDA recognizes that farmers, ranchers, and consumers alike – use data daily, from deciding when to plant, harvest or sell their crops, when to turn out cattle to pasture, or where to buy fresh fruits and vegetables.  This is why it is important that data be made available, open and accessible, to facilitate the best-informed decisions.

Around the world, a movement called the “open data revolution” is under way to make data available for public use.  This movement is expected to generate new insights, drive better decision-making, and enable governments, civil society, and the private sector to better target interventions and programs.

All of this is why the U.S. Government, led by USDA, was a founding partner of the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN) initiative and why it continues to support the advancement of open data for agriculture and nutrition around the world.  Now with over 500 partners, GODAN continues to support the sharing of available, accessible, and usable open data for agriculture and nutrition to help ensure global food security.

If we’re going to feed over 9 billion people by 2050, we need open data policies to make decisions based on facts and evidence. This global perspective will help identify data already available and data gaps that exist, and sharpen the focus on how open data can foster innovation and collaborative research, creating whole new kinds of growth around the world.

Introducing New Rural Housing Data from USDA

For the first time, USDA’s Rural Housing Service is publicly releasing data across every program area in which the agency provides loans, guarantees, and grants—multifamily housing, single-family housing, and community facilities. This set of data will bring stakeholders and the public unprecedented insights into rural housing program delivery, impacts, challenges, and opportunities across the country. It will be updated regularly, so check back frequently for the latest release.

Click here for the data.

Mapping applications like PolicyMap are incorporating USDA’s rural housing data and overlaying them with other indicators.
Mapping applications like PolicyMap are incorporating USDA’s rural housing data and overlaying them with other indicators.

Arctic

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Climate

Rivers of Data – Inland Electronic Navigation Charts

Nautical charts provide critical information to mariners in support of safe navigation. Historically these charts have been printed and distributed on paper, but modern communications systems allow for electronic charts that are able to be updated as new information becomes available. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Coast Survey produces charts for coastal and Great Lakes areas, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers produces charts for America’s inland rivers through the Inland Electronic Navigation Chart program. The Inland Electronic Navigation Chart (IENC) program covers thousands of miles of navigable waterways. America’s inland waterways move millions of tons of commodities every year, and the work of surveying, charting, and dredging sediment is continually ongoing due to the dynamic conditions and constant change happening along any given river.

Rivers included in the Inland Electronic Navigation Chart (IENC) program include the Allegheny River, Arkansas River, Atchafalaya River, Black Warrior-Tombigbee Rivers, Cumberland River, Green River, Illinois River, Kaskaskia, Kanawha River, Lower Mississippi River, Missouri River, Monongahela River, Ohio River, Ouachita River, Red River, Tennessee River (including the Tellico, Hiwassee, Clinch and Emory Rivers), Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, Upper Mississippi River, and the White River. Anyone can access the navigation charts for these rivers, which show depth contours, buoys, lights, known hazards, and reference landmarks.

References and Data.Gov Links:

Inland Electronic Navigational Charts (IENC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/inland-electronic-navigational-charts-ienc

USACE Inland Electronic Navigation Charts Homepage, http://ienccloud.us/

NOAA Electronic Navigational Charts (ENC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/noaa-electronic-navigational-charts-enc7cce5

NOAA Raster Navigational Charts (RNC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/noaa-raster-navigational-charts-rnc7af22

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Coastal Flooding

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Ecosystem Vulnerability

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Energy

Introducing the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) redesigned International Energy Portal

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has redesigned its International Energy Portal to streamline navigation, simplify data presentation, and implement responsive design use. EIA based many of the redesigned aspects on customer feedback about the earlier beta release of the portal.

The International Energy Portal contains EIA’s country-level energy data. Users can view and download datasets for consumption, production, trade, reserves, and carbon dioxide emissions for different fuels and energy sources. The portal also provides access to EIA’s entire library of international reports, articles, and analyses, including Country Analysis Briefs.

Find data in fewer steps.

Users can select and explore prepopulated, fuel-specific default tables that provide annual data on energy production, consumption, trade, and reserves. Data options allow users to change time frequency and energy units, add sources and activities, and select other countries for comparison.

Customize data tables.

Customizable data tables allow users to sort by energy source and activity or by country and region. Users can now see and select countries within continental regions, International Energy Agency regions, and economic groups.

Tailor visualizations to user needs.

Animated maps allow users to see how trends in energy production, consumption, reserves, imports, and exports have changed over time. Other visualization options include heat maps, bubble maps, and time series.

Export data easily.

EIA’s international information is easily downloaded as data, maps, and charts for presentations, reports, and spreadsheets. Data downloads are available in CSV and JSON formats. Application Programming Interface (API) keys are available with EIA’s Microsoft Excel and Google Sheets add-ins, which make regular data updates much easier. Users can also download static versions of charts and tables in PDF or PNG image files.

Hourly Electric Grid Monitor reports new information on U.S. electricity demand, net generation, and interchange collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

To a federal statistical agency like the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), there’s nothing more satisfying than providing needed information that can facilitate more informed analysis and policy decisions on a national and regional level. EIA recently launched its new Hourly Electric Grid Monitor, a redesigned and enhanced version of EIA’s existing U.S. Electric System Operating Data website.  The data for the Hourly Electric Grid Monitor come from the Form EIA-930, Hourly and Daily Balancing Authority Operations Report, which collects hourly electricity demand, forecast demand, net generation, and interchange data from the 65 electricity balancing authorities that operate the electric grid in the Lower 48 states.  The Hourly Electric Grid Monitor incorporates two new data elements: hourly electricity generation by energy source and hourly subregional demand. The new website also provides new and more flexible options for visualizing the data and allows users to create custom dashboards that can be saved and shared.

Although electric system balancing authorities covering most of the United States have released real-time information on grid operations since the late 1990s, EIA’s Hourly Electric Grid Monitor expands the availability of data to the entire contiguous 48 states, and makes it available in a consistent format from a single source.

Among other applications, the data can be used to provide timely information on electric system recovery after power interruptions and to help evaluate the effects of renewable energy, smart grid, and demand-response programs on power system operations.  The tool allows you to visualize and analyze:

  • Total U.S. and regional electricity demand on an hourly basis
  • The varied mix of energy sources used to generate electricity at different times and locations
  • The hourly flow of electricity between electric systems
  • The wide variety in electric systems’ daily demand shapes and the seasonality of daily demand patterns
  • The extent to which electric systems rely on internal and external sources of supply to meet their demand
  • Potential stress on electric systems when actual demand significantly exceeds forecasted demand
  • Total hourly flows of electricity with Canada and Mexico

Have fun exploring!

Energy Infrastructure

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Food Resilience

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Geospatial

Rivers of Data – Inland Electronic Navigation Charts

Nautical charts provide critical information to mariners in support of safe navigation. Historically these charts have been printed and distributed on paper, but modern communications systems allow for electronic charts that are able to be updated as new information becomes available. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Coast Survey produces charts for coastal and Great Lakes areas, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers produces charts for America’s inland rivers through the Inland Electronic Navigation Chart program. The Inland Electronic Navigation Chart (IENC) program covers thousands of miles of navigable waterways. America’s inland waterways move millions of tons of commodities every year, and the work of surveying, charting, and dredging sediment is continually ongoing due to the dynamic conditions and constant change happening along any given river.

Rivers included in the Inland Electronic Navigation Chart (IENC) program include the Allegheny River, Arkansas River, Atchafalaya River, Black Warrior-Tombigbee Rivers, Cumberland River, Green River, Illinois River, Kaskaskia, Kanawha River, Lower Mississippi River, Missouri River, Monongahela River, Ohio River, Ouachita River, Red River, Tennessee River (including the Tellico, Hiwassee, Clinch and Emory Rivers), Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, Upper Mississippi River, and the White River. Anyone can access the navigation charts for these rivers, which show depth contours, buoys, lights, known hazards, and reference landmarks.

References and Data.Gov Links:

Inland Electronic Navigational Charts (IENC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/inland-electronic-navigational-charts-ienc

USACE Inland Electronic Navigation Charts Homepage, http://ienccloud.us/

NOAA Electronic Navigational Charts (ENC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/noaa-electronic-navigational-charts-enc7cce5

NOAA Raster Navigational Charts (RNC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/noaa-raster-navigational-charts-rnc7af22

Human Health

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Maritime

Rivers of Data – Inland Electronic Navigation Charts

Nautical charts provide critical information to mariners in support of safe navigation. Historically these charts have been printed and distributed on paper, but modern communications systems allow for electronic charts that are able to be updated as new information becomes available. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Coast Survey produces charts for coastal and Great Lakes areas, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers produces charts for America’s inland rivers through the Inland Electronic Navigation Chart program. The Inland Electronic Navigation Chart (IENC) program covers thousands of miles of navigable waterways. America’s inland waterways move millions of tons of commodities every year, and the work of surveying, charting, and dredging sediment is continually ongoing due to the dynamic conditions and constant change happening along any given river.

Rivers included in the Inland Electronic Navigation Chart (IENC) program include the Allegheny River, Arkansas River, Atchafalaya River, Black Warrior-Tombigbee Rivers, Cumberland River, Green River, Illinois River, Kaskaskia, Kanawha River, Lower Mississippi River, Missouri River, Monongahela River, Ohio River, Ouachita River, Red River, Tennessee River (including the Tellico, Hiwassee, Clinch and Emory Rivers), Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, Upper Mississippi River, and the White River. Anyone can access the navigation charts for these rivers, which show depth contours, buoys, lights, known hazards, and reference landmarks.

References and Data.Gov Links:

Inland Electronic Navigational Charts (IENC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/inland-electronic-navigational-charts-ienc

USACE Inland Electronic Navigation Charts Homepage, http://ienccloud.us/

NOAA Electronic Navigational Charts (ENC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/noaa-electronic-navigational-charts-enc7cce5

NOAA Raster Navigational Charts (RNC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/noaa-raster-navigational-charts-rnc7af22

Clean Air Practices at Ports – EPA Interactive Map

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ports Initiative works in collaboration with the port industry, communities, and all levels of government to improve environmental performance and increase economic prosperity. This effort helps people living and working near ports across the country breathe cleaner air and live better lives. The Ports Initiative recently release an interactive map highlighting clear air practices at some of the largest ports around the United States.

The interactive map can be found at: https://www.epa.gov/ports-initiative/best-port-wide-planning-practices-improve-air-quality#clean-air

The Ports Initiative website also includes information on methods for performing an emissions inventory, a toolkit to assist community and port collaboration efforts, information on funding opportunities, and other technical resources.

Visit the Ports Initiative main page at: https://www.epa.gov/ports-initiative
Contact the Ports Initiative at: talkaboutports@epa.gov

Meta - The Data.gov Blog

Launch of the New Data.gov Catalog

On February 5, 2021 we will be launching a new version of the Data.gov catalog.

The new catalog is the culmination of many months of work in updating the behind-the-scenes functioning of the Data.gov catalog, which automatically harvests over 1000 different sources from federal, state and local open data sources to provide a comprehensive catalog of open government data. The new catalog runs an updated version of CKAN, the open source technology behind the Data.gov catalog, and should improve the process of automatically updating Data.gov with the most recent datasets.

Most users will not notice any differences in the new catalog. At first, the front page of the catalog will show a small reduction in total datasets. That reflects the deletion of outdated datasets from harvest sources that are no longer maintained, mostly at the state and local level. As we have noted in the past, the front page number of total datasets changes frequently as many harvest sources are checked every day for updates. Also, the catalog counts collections of datasets as “1” in the total number. The validation and update of all 1,098 harvest sources should result in an improved user experience with a higher degree of accuracy and fewer broken links. In the coming months, we will deploy additional features to continue to improve the quality of the Data.gov catalog.

COVID-19 is Complex, as is COVID-19 Open Data

This post was originally published on the Healthdata.gov blog by Kristen Honey, Chief Data Scientist and Senior Advisor to Assistant Secretary for Health (ASH), HHS; Amy Gleason, Data Strategy and Execution Workgroup Lead, U.S. Digital Service; and Kevin Duvall, Deputy Chief Data Officer (CDO), Office of the CDO, HHS

 

Due to demand, please access the data files here:
– Download: https://healthdata.gov/sites/default/files/reported_hospital_capacity_admissions_facility-level_weekly_average_timeseries_20201207.csv
– Data Dictionary: https://healthdata.gov/covid-19-reported-patient-impact-and-hospital-capacity-facility-data-dictionary

Today, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published COVID-19 hospital data at the facility level for each week, going back to August 1st 2020. This information was previously aggregated by state. This new data and its data quality are paramount to the U.S. pandemic response. COVID-19 models, analyses, and predictive analytics can only be as good as the data they ingest. By sharing these new hospital COVID-19 capacity data at the facility-level with the public, the opportunity exists to improve data quality.

This data is tremendously complex and is the result of substantial ongoing efforts by hospital, state, and Federal personnel who collaborate to meet daily data reporting requirements. This ongoing collaboration has steadily improved data quality and reporting consistency in recent weeks, even as the content of hospital capacity data has become more complex.

We opted not to have perfect be the enemy of good, so these datasets will have imperfections. To continue improving the quality of data, we welcome your feedback. When more people access and use the data, we have more collective ability to identify gaps, errors, or other problems with these COVID-19 datasets. All stakeholders — local community coordinators, data scientists, data journalists, and healthcare researchers — are encouraged to download, analyze, study the datasets, and share your feedback with HealthData.gov.

We also encourage you to visit and contribute to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about this hospital-level data. These living FAQs are crowdsourced from the public, so your contributions will improve these FAQs over time.

Commitment to Transparency and Open Data

By opening COVID-19 datasets, our collective goal is to accelerate scientific and public health insights and shorten the time it takes for COVID-19 information and solutions to save lives. Our HHS efforts are enabling a data-driven ecosystem for everyone. Based on public feedback and interaction with the COVID-19 datasets, this open-data ecosystem will evolve while guided by these principles: Transparency. Sharing. Privacy. Security. Community.

Today’s unprecedented pandemic demands near-real-time data sharing across government, across diverse sectors, and with the public. HHS is aggressively responding to this call-to-action by responsibly unlocking information wherever our societal benefits of data access outweigh the potential risks. This is a collaborative effort led by HHS Office of the Chief Data Officer, within the Office of the Chief Information Officer, in close coordination with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), local/state/tribal governments, HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH), HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), and the White House U.S. Digital Service.

Beyond the whole-of-government response, COVID-19 necessitates a whole-of-America response. Your public input so far has enabled HHS to identify and prioritize information of highest value. We appreciate the hard-working journalists, data scientists, academic healthcare researchers, business innovators, and Americans who are giving time, energy, and insights to help us responsibly open data related to the novel coronavirus.

The data reporting is one part of the whole-of-government response and is to ensure that every patient requiring hospitalization receives the care they need. Patients should not be discouraged from seeking hospital care based on their interpretation of the data. Hospitals have protocols in place to keep patients safe from exposure and to ensure all patients are prioritized for care. By working together across sectors, we are harnessing all capabilities and resources to unleash the power of U.S. data for the COVID-19 response.

Together, we can combat COVID-19.

Disclaimer: Please visit the CDC’s website on COVID-19 for the most up-to-date information and COVID-19 guidance.

Ocean

Water Column Sonar Data Collection

NOAA collects and uses active acoustic (or sonar) data for a variety of mapping requirements. As the national archive for multibeam bathymetric data, NGDC manages over 15 million nautical miles of ship trackline data from sources worldwide. In 2011, NGDC, in partnership with NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), initiated a new archive for high resolution data collected with sonars capable of mapping the water column.

Water column sonar data are collected on NOAA fishery survey vessels and academic and international fleets, and are used to assess the physical and biological characteristics of the ocean. Primary uses include 3-D mapping of fish schools and other mid-water marine organisms, assessing biological abundance, species identification, and habitat characterization. These data are also useful for evaluating underwater gas seeps, remotely monitoring undersea oil spills, and bathymetry.

NGDC is working with scientists at NMFS and the Joint Hydrographic Center to ensure the long-term preservation and world-wide dissemination of these data.

Maritime Limits and Boundaries of the United States

NOAA is responsible for depicting on its nautical charts the limits of the 12 nautical mile Territorial Sea, 24 nautical mile Contiguous Zone, and 200 nautical mile Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). The outer limit of each of these zones is measured from the U.S. normal baseline, which coincides with the low water line depicted on NOAA charts and includes closing lines across the entrances of legal bays and rivers, consistent with international law.

Transportation

Rivers of Data – Inland Electronic Navigation Charts

Nautical charts provide critical information to mariners in support of safe navigation. Historically these charts have been printed and distributed on paper, but modern communications systems allow for electronic charts that are able to be updated as new information becomes available. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Coast Survey produces charts for coastal and Great Lakes areas, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers produces charts for America’s inland rivers through the Inland Electronic Navigation Chart program. The Inland Electronic Navigation Chart (IENC) program covers thousands of miles of navigable waterways. America’s inland waterways move millions of tons of commodities every year, and the work of surveying, charting, and dredging sediment is continually ongoing due to the dynamic conditions and constant change happening along any given river.

Rivers included in the Inland Electronic Navigation Chart (IENC) program include the Allegheny River, Arkansas River, Atchafalaya River, Black Warrior-Tombigbee Rivers, Cumberland River, Green River, Illinois River, Kaskaskia, Kanawha River, Lower Mississippi River, Missouri River, Monongahela River, Ohio River, Ouachita River, Red River, Tennessee River (including the Tellico, Hiwassee, Clinch and Emory Rivers), Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, Upper Mississippi River, and the White River. Anyone can access the navigation charts for these rivers, which show depth contours, buoys, lights, known hazards, and reference landmarks.

References and Data.Gov Links:

Inland Electronic Navigational Charts (IENC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/inland-electronic-navigational-charts-ienc

USACE Inland Electronic Navigation Charts Homepage, http://ienccloud.us/

NOAA Electronic Navigational Charts (ENC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/noaa-electronic-navigational-charts-enc7cce5

NOAA Raster Navigational Charts (RNC), https://catalog.data.gov/dataset/noaa-raster-navigational-charts-rnc7af22

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Tribal Nations

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?

Water

Microsoft Launches “Innovation Challenge” around Food Resilience

WASHINGTON, July 27, 2015 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture is partnering with Microsoft to launch the “Innovation Challenge,” a competition to develop software applications that help farmers, agriculture businesses, and consumers explore how climate change will affect their food systems.

The Innovation Challenge was formally launched on July 27th at a conference of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association in San Francisco. Challenge participants have 3 months to create their applications, with a top prize of $25,000 going to the most creative application that best exploits USDA data sets that are now being hosted on Microsoft Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Entrants are invited to develop and publish new applications and tools that can help users analyze multiple sources of information, including key USDA data sets. In addition, Microsoft is granting cloud computing awards to aid university researchers and students that are looking to take part in the challenge.  Challenge winners will be announced in December 2015.

Full details of the challenge can be found at >http://usdaapps.challengepost.com<.

Launch of Energy & Infrastructure Resilience theme of Climate.Data.Gov

To help communities, governments, businesses, and research institutions better understand and plan for the risks of storms, floods, and other climate-change-related impacts, the U.S. Government is enhancing accessibility and releasing today a collection of datasets containing scientific and technical information that may help inform the current and potential future effects of climate change on energy and infrastructure.

These data are also being made available via mapping services on Geoplatform.gov. The resources provided here can be used to explore and develop insights for a number of relevant questions, such as:

1) How are fundamental energy resources impacted by climate?

2) How might changes in climate and natural resource availability impact energy conversion infrastructure and processes?

3) How might climate impact energy transmission and distribution systems?

4) How might energy demands be impacted by climate change, including heating and cooling but also energy losses and energy used for adaptation by other sectors?

5) What capacity do we currently have to adapt energy systems, and how might technology solutions, systems designs, and operational changes improve energy system resilience for climate change?

6) How might climate change impact energy infrastructure and its interactions with networked and interconnected infrastructure systems?